August Carapace

August Carapace

I chose to begin with seashells because of their structure and form. Although simple, a spiral creates a complex group of shapes and planes. There is elegance in a seashell that I hope to capture again and again in my work. To achieve one large block of wood, I stacked ¾” poplar boards on top of each other. By using screws initially, I was able to dismantle the pieces at any point to gain access to tricky spots. When it was ready, I glued the pieces together before doing the finish work. For the finish, I sanded with finer and finer grits of sandpaper until I achieved an almost glossy surface with the wood alone. Then I applied polyurethane with a rag, rubbing it into the grain. I repeated this process about 10 times, each time applying as thin a coat as I could until I had a beautiful deep finish.

11″ W x 11″ D x 25″ H

Poplar

$2700

 

 

Copyright © 2014 Sam Hingston, All rights reserved.

Spotted Carapace

Spotted Carapace

Spotted Carapace was another chance to explore the spiral structure of a seashell. I did a few things differently this time, practical lessons I learned making August Carapace. I also added the spots for an interesting effect. I soaked pieces of poplar dowel in a stain until color had seeped in a little ways giving a nice halo of color when cut at a cross section. The spiral passage actually goes up inside the cone for several turns. It doesn’t add anything visual to the piece, but it was a fun challenge to see if I could make it work.

 

11″ W x 11″ D x 24.5″ H

Poplar.

$3100

 

 

Copyright © 2014 Sam Hingston, All rights reserved.

Grand Aegis

Grand Aegis

It was a conch shell that inspired me to attempt making seashells in the first place. I had seen a large and very beautiful one and thought how impressive it would be made of wood – particularly on a larger scale. August Carapace and Spotted Carapace were both much larger than life, but with Grand Aegis I wanted to go even bigger. Working with poplar I have been limited in size by the width of boards available to me. I decided to use solid hardwood maple ply which meant I could increase the size without having to sit two boards next to each other.

Another advantage to using ply is the visual effect. The thinness of the layers adds a beautiful look to the finish, and the difference in color between each layer helps to accentuate dimension.

 

 
21″ W x 15″ D x 21″ H

Laminated Maple

$3600

 

 

Copyright © 2014 Sam Hingston, All rights reserved.

Grand Aegis

Grand Aegis

It was a conch shell that inspired me to attempt making seashells in the first place. I had seen a large and very beautiful one and thought how impressive it would be made of wood – particularly on a larger scale. August Carapace and Spotted Carapace were both much larger than life, but with Grand Aegis I wanted to go even bigger. Working with poplar I have been limited in size by the width of boards available to me. I decided to use solid hardwood maple ply which meant I could increase the size without having to sit two boards next to each other.

Another advantage to using ply is the visual effect. The thinness of the layers adds a beautiful look to the finish, and the difference in color between each layer helps to accentuate dimension.

 

 
21″ W x 15″ D x 21″ H

Laminated Maple

$3600

 

 

Copyright © 2014 Sam Hingston, All rights reserved.

Grand Aegis

Grand Aegis

It was a conch shell that inspired me to attempt making seashells in the first place. I had seen a large and very beautiful one and thought how impressive it would be made of wood – particularly on a larger scale. August Carapace and Spotted Carapace were both much larger than life, but with Grand Aegis I wanted to go even bigger. Working with poplar I have been limited in size by the width of boards available to me. I decided to use solid hardwood maple ply which meant I could increase the size without having to sit two boards next to each other.

Another advantage to using ply is the visual effect. The thinness of the layers adds a beautiful look to the finish, and the difference in color between each layer helps to accentuate dimension.

 

 
21″ W x 15″ D x 21″ H

Laminated Maple

$3600

 

 

Copyright © 2014 Sam Hingston, All rights reserved.

Dawn

Dawn

The initial inspiration for Dawn was the grain and color patterns produced by carving the lip of Grand Aegis, every layer creating a line that follows the curves of the finished piece. I wanted to experiment with making those curves more dramatic and interesting. I focused heavily on shape in my design, keeping it simple while giving it a subtle complexity. I thought that reflection would be an interesting way to add dimension to the piece without complicating the structure. With a horizontal mirror in the center of the sculpture, what you see changes depending on where you stand. Standing back from the piece you see the whole structure with the Sun half way above the horizon. As you get closer the reflection grows and replaces the lower dark half of the circle until you see only the full sun reflected in the mirror.

 

29.5" W x 11.5" D x 19" H

Wood, Glass, Alabaster

Now showing at Bush Barn Art Center.

$3800

 

 

Copyright © 2014 Sam Hingston, All rights reserved.

Dawn

Dawn

The initial inspiration for Dawn was the grain and color patterns produced by carving the lip of Grand Aegis, every layer creating a line that follows the curves of the finished piece. I wanted to experiment with making those curves more dramatic and interesting. I focused heavily on shape in my design, keeping it simple while giving it a subtle complexity. I thought that reflection would be an interesting way to add dimension to the piece without complicating the structure. With a horizontal mirror in the center of the sculpture, what you see changes depending on where you stand. Standing back from the piece you see the whole structure with the Sun half way above the horizon. As you get closer the reflection grows and replaces the lower dark half of the circle until you see only the full sun reflected in the mirror.

 

29.5" W x 11.5" D x 19" H

Wood, Glass, Alabaster

Now showing at Bush Barn Art Center.

$3800

 

 

Copyright © 2014 Sam Hingston, All rights reserved.

Inception

Inception

Inception began as another generation of Dawn and evolved as the work progressed. Initially I had something quite different in mind from the end result. I wanted to spend a little more time working with the idea of fire or flame carved in the maple ply. The grains and colors of the different layers create such a nice effect when carved. I liked the way an alabaster semi globe placed on the mirror looked like a globe suspended in mid air. It reminded me of a supernova or the Big Bang. I liked the sense of beginning and thought that an apple was the perfect way to say it.

 

21.5″ W x 21.5″ D x 9″ H

Maple and Glass.

$2900

 

 

Copyright © 2014 Sam Hingston, All rights reserved.

Leaf on Canvas

Leaf on Canvas

I chose copper and wood for Leaf on Canvas because of color and texture. The wooden portion of the leaf was technically tricky because I positioned the maple ply so that the lines in the wood went at opposite angles on either side. This suggests the direction of the veins in the leaf but made for some challenging joints at the tip and stem. After pounding the copper into shape I cut its silhouette out of the wood. I used tints for rich deep colors to paint the shadow of the leaf on the canvas. Then I sealed it all with polyurethane.

 

20.75″ W x 10.75″ D x 9.5″ H

Wood, Copper, Fabric.

$2600

 

 

Copyright © 2014 Sam Hingston, All rights reserved.

 

Leaf on Canvas

Leaf on Canvas

I chose copper and wood for Leaf on Canvas because of color and texture. The wooden portion of the leaf was technically tricky because I positioned the maple ply so that the lines in the wood went at opposite angles on either side. This suggests the direction of the veins in the leaf but made for some challenging joints at the tip and stem. After pounding the copper into shape I cut its silhouette out of the wood. I used tints for rich deep colors to paint the shadow of the leaf on the canvas. Then I sealed it all with polyurethane.

 

20.75″ W x 10.75″ D x 9.5″ H

Wood, Copper, Fabric.

$2600

 

 

Copyright © 2014 Sam Hingston, All rights reserved.

Leaf on Canvas

Leaf on Canvas

I chose copper and wood for Leaf on Canvas because of color and texture. The wooden portion of the leaf was technically tricky because I positioned the maple ply so that the lines in the wood went at opposite angles on either side. This suggests the direction of the veins in the leaf but made for some challenging joints at the tip and stem. After pounding the copper into shape I cut its silhouette out of the wood. I used tints for rich deep colors to paint the shadow of the leaf on the canvas. Then I sealed it all with polyurethane.

 

20.75″ W x 10.75″ D x 9.5″ H

Wood, Copper, Fabric.

$2600

 

Copyright © 2014 Sam Hingston, All rights reserved.

Dandelion Dream

Dandelion Dream

Dandelion Dream grew out of one of its parts. It was the idea of its top piece, like the flames in Dawn but repeated in a circle. Picturing a half globe done like this made me think of the head of a dandelion and the idea developed from there. I paid a lot of attention to shapes and lines, including negative space in this design. I wanted to capture the sense or suggestion of a dandelion while keeping it abstract enough that you can’t be sure what it is.

 

14″ W x 14″ D x 24″ H

Wood, Copper, Alabaster.

Granite base.

$3800

Now showing at Bush Barn Art Center

 

Copyright © 2014 Sam Hingston, All rights reserved.

Dandelion Dream

Dandelion Dream

Dandelion Dream grew out of one of its parts. It was the idea of its top piece, like the flames in Dawn but repeated in a circle. Picturing a half globe done like this made me think of the head of a dandelion and the idea developed from there. I paid a lot of attention to shapes and lines, including negative space in this design. I wanted to capture the sense or suggestion of a dandelion while keeping it abstract enough that you can’t be sure what it is.

 

14″ W x 14″ D x 24″ H

Wood, Copper, Alabaster.

Granite base.

$3800

Now showing at Bush Barn Art Center

 

Copyright © 2014 Sam Hingston, All rights reserved.

Tangle

Tangle

Tangle is the first of three pieces that I’ve made into a limited edition. It is much smaller than my previous work and was designed with accurate reproduction in mind. I took three pieces of wood cut into squiggly lines, and by passing through the center point at alternating intervals, I essentially braided them together. I used solid maple ply because the layers create a beautiful effect when tapered and the ply is a little flexible which reduces the risk of breakage from the stress of the weaving.

 

4.5″ W x 4.5″ D x 13.25″ H

Laminated maple, Birch. Cement base.

Limited edition of 25.

$300

 

Copyright © 2014 Sam Hingston, All rights reserved.

Tangle

Tangle

Tangle is the first of three pieces that I’ve made into a limited edition. It is much smaller than my previous work and was designed with accurate reproduction in mind. I took three pieces of wood cut into squiggly lines, and by passing through the center point at alternating intervals, I essentially braided them together. I used solid maple ply because the layers create a beautiful effect when tapered and the ply is a little flexible which reduces the risk of breakage from the stress of the weaving.

 

4.5″ W x 4.5″ D x 13.25″ H

Laminated maple, Birch. Cement base.

Limited edition of 25.

$300

 

Copyright © 2014 Sam Hingston, All rights reserved.

Tangle

Tangle

Tangle is the first of three pieces that I’ve made into a limited edition. It is much smaller than my previous work and was designed with accurate reproduction in mind. I took three pieces of wood cut into squiggly lines, and by passing through the center point at alternating intervals, I essentially braided them together. I used solid maple ply because the layers create a beautiful effect when tapered and the ply is a little flexible which reduces the risk of breakage from the stress of the weaving.

 

4.5″ W x 4.5″ D x 13.25″ H

Laminated maple, Birch. Cement base.

Limited edition of 25.

$300

 

Copyright © 2014 Sam Hingston, All rights reserved.

Burn

Burn

Burn is the second of three limited editions. Like Tangle I wove wood, but this time moved the sphere to the bottom of the piece. I chose fire because, although there is an order to weaving the wood like this, it looks somewhat chaotic and random. It lent itself well to depicting fire.

 

4.5″ W x 4.5″ D x 14.5″ H

Laminated maple, Glass.

Limited edition of 25.

$350

 

Copyright © 2014 Sam Hingston, All rights reserved.

Burn

Burn

Burn is the second of three limited editions. Like Tangle I wove wood, but this time moved the sphere to the bottom of the piece. I chose fire because, although there is an order to weaving the wood like this, it looks somewhat chaotic and random. It lent itself well to depicting fire.

 

4.5″ W x 4.5″ D x 14.5″ H

Laminated maple, Glass.

Limited edition of 25.

$350

 

Copyright © 2014 Sam Hingston, All rights reserved.

Together

Together

Together is the third of three limited editions. This time I wanted to reverse the direction of the weave. I did a couple of experiments, and realized that the woven part looked a lot like arms when I put a sphere in the center as a head. The idea of the piece then became three people putting their heads together. The back and legs made it a bit more difficult to weave this one. I suppose it goes without saying that I figured it out.

 

7.5″ W x 7.5″ D x 13″ H

Laminated maple, Stainless steel.

Limited edition of 25.

$400

 

Copyright © 2014 Sam Hingston, All rights reserved.

Together

Together

Together is the third of three limited editions. This time I wanted to reverse the direction of the weave. I did a couple of experiments, and realized that the woven part looked a lot like arms when I put a sphere in the center as a head. The idea of the piece then became three people putting their heads together. The back and legs made it a bit more difficult to weave this one. I suppose it goes without saying that I figured it out.

 

7.5″ W x 7.5″ D x 13″ H

Laminated maple, Stainless steel.

Limited edition of 25.

$400

 

Copyright © 2014 Sam Hingston, All rights reserved.

Blue Phoenix

Blue Phoenix

Blue Phoenix evolved out of a single piece of wood with a beautiful grain pattern. It looked like a wing, so I cut it in half crosswise to get a mirror image pair. From there the design grew. I focused a lot on shape and pattern, and as always, I was looking for simple but complex.
This piece let me experiment a bit with laminating different colored woods to each other before being shaped. The designs or patterns that result are determined by how the piece is contoured which makes it very interesting work.

 
 

9″ W x 7″ D x 29″ H

Wood, Glass, Stainless steel.

Granite base.

$3100

Now showing at Art on Broadway.

 

Copyright © 2014 Sam Hingston, All rights reserved.

Blue Phoenix

Blue Phoenix

Blue Phoenix evolved out of a single piece of wood with a beautiful grain pattern. It looked like a wing, so I cut it in half crosswise to get a mirror image pair. From there the design grew. I focused a lot on shape and pattern, and as always, I was looking for simple but complex.
This piece let me experiment a bit with laminating different colored woods to each other before being shaped. The designs or patterns that result are determined by how the piece is contoured which makes it very interesting work.

 
 

9″ W x 7″ D x 29″ H

Wood, Glass, Stainless steel.

Granite base.

$3100

Now showing at Art on Broadway.

 

Copyright © 2014 Sam Hingston, All rights reserved.

I've Missed You

I've Missed You

I often make bases for my sculptures using rapid set, high strength cement, and after the mold is filled there is invariably some left over to play with. I found that before the cement goes hard, there are several minutes where you can mold it much like sandy clay. After figuring out the body positions for I've Missed You, I made a wire armature and began building the cement up around it. I mixed a little cement, and when it started to go hard I molded it into place. The process is quite slow as you can only work a little bit at a time. Also, because I used two cement colors, each figure had to be done separately. Once the cement was sufficiently hardened I used grinders and sanders to smooth out any rough spots. Before this piece, I focused heavily on structure and form. For I’ve Missed You I wanted to consider other less tangible elements in my design. This began my effort to capture  in my artwork things like emotion, feeling, movement and the effect one object might have on another.

 

10.5″ W x 10.5″ D x 25″ H

Hand molded cement.

SOLD

 

Copyright © 2014 Sam Hingston, All rights reserved.

I've Missed You

I've Missed You

I often make bases for my sculptures using rapid set, high strength cement, and after the mold is filled there is invariably some left over to play with. I found that before the cement goes hard, there are several minutes where you can mold it much like sandy clay. After figuring out the body positions for I've Missed You, I made a wire armature and began building the cement up around it. I mixed a little cement, and when it started to go hard I molded it into place. The process is quite slow as you can only work a little bit at a time. Also, because I used two cement colors, each figure had to be done separately. Once the cement was sufficiently hardened I used grinders and sanders to smooth out any rough spots. Before this piece, I focused heavily on structure and form. For I’ve Missed You I wanted to consider other less tangible elements in my design. This began my effort to capture  in my artwork things like emotion, feeling, movement and the effect one object might have on another.

 

10.5″ W x 10.5″ D x 25″ H

Hand molded cement.

SOLD

 

Copyright © 2014 Sam Hingston, All rights reserved.

I've Missed You

I've Missed You

I often make bases for my sculptures using rapid set, high strength cement, and after the mold is filled there is invariably some left over to play with. I found that before the cement goes hard, there are several minutes where you can mold it much like sandy clay. After figuring out the body positions for I've Missed You, I made a wire armature and began building the cement up around it. I mixed a little cement, and when it started to go hard I molded it into place. The process is quite slow as you can only work a little bit at a time. Also, because I used two cement colors, each figure had to be done separately. Once the cement was sufficiently hardened I used grinders and sanders to smooth out any rough spots. Before this piece, I focused heavily on structure and form. For I’ve Missed You I wanted to consider other less tangible elements in my design. This began my effort to capture  in my artwork things like emotion, feeling, movement and the effect one object might have on another.

 

10.5″ W x 10.5″ D x 25″ H

Hand molded cement.

SOLD

 

Copyright © 2014 Sam Hingston, All rights reserved.

Monday

Monday

With Monday I kept different colored cements from splashing over onto each other when wet by using Play-Doh to create a barrier. Once one color of cement was hard, I covered the areas I didn’t want touched with Play-Doh and then applied the next color of cement. Because Play-Doh is water soluble, it washes off taking unwanted cement with it. This technique worked well to create the opening in the blanket.

 

10″ W x 9.5″ D x 13.5″ H

Hand molded cement, Wood.

$1150

 

Copyright © 2014 Sam Hingston, All rights reserved.

Monday

Monday

With Monday I kept different colored cements from splashing over onto each other when wet by using Play-Doh to create a barrier. Once one color of cement was hard, I covered the areas I didn’t want touched with Play-Doh and then applied the next color of cement. Because Play-Doh is water soluble, it washes off taking unwanted cement with it. This technique worked well to create the opening in the blanket.

 

10″ W x 9.5″ D x 13.5″ H

Hand molded cement, Wood.

$1150

 

Copyright © 2014 Sam Hingston, All rights reserved.

The Nines

The Nines

The Nines was an attempt to describe a woman with one single line. By twisting the silhouette, I was able to give the piece dimension and motion in a simple and graceful way.

 

5.25″ W x 5″ D x 14.75″ H

Cherry.

Wood base.

$600

 

Copyright © 2014 Sam Hingston, All rights reserved.

The Nines

The Nines

The Nines was an attempt to describe a woman with one single line. By twisting the silhouette, I was able to give the piece dimension and motion in a simple and graceful way.

 

5.25″ W x 5″ D x 14.75″ H

Cherry.

Wood base.

$600

 

Copyright © 2014 Sam Hingston, All rights reserved.

Morning Herald

Morning Herald

Morning Herald was made with wood salvaged from a cargo ship. The wood was used to pack containers and then discarded after the cargo had been unloaded. I don’t know what kind of wood it is, but it has a nice reddish quality and beautiful grain. I painted the buried portion of the inset glass balls with mirror paint. This gives them a pearl like quality when viewed head on that also shows a reflection.

4.5" W x 4.5" D x 17.5" H

Wood, Glass.

Granite base.

$550

 

Copyright © 2014 Sam Hingston, All rights reserved.

In Tension

In Tension

The idea for In Tension came from pondering a stainless steel ball bearing I had intended to use in an edition of Together. It was heavy, which made me consider how to express the sense of weight in sculpture. Eventually I came to the idea of a hammock of fabric. The antique nails were a fun way to attach the fabric to the rails, and they create a nice contrast with the other parts of the piece. They were given to me as a “donation to the arts” by Hippo Hardware in Portland after hours of searching through their endless supply of bits and pieces.

 
 

17″ W x 8″ D x 5.5″ H

Wood, Stainless Steel, Reclaimed metal.

Granite Base.

$2800

Now showing at Art on Broadway.

 

Copyright © 2014 Sam Hingston, All rights reserved.

The Winner

The Winner

I found The Winner particularly interesting because of the clothing. One of the things I enjoyed about making Monday was creating the impression of a human body under fabric. The Winner was similar but quite a bit more complex. I used Play-Doh again to separate the colors.

10.5″ W x 10.5″ D x 27.5″ H

Hand molded cement.

$1700

 

Copyright © 2014 Sam Hingston, All rights reserved.

The Winner

The Winner

I found The Winner particularly interesting because of the clothing. One of the things I enjoyed about making Monday was creating the impression of a human body under fabric. The Winner was similar but quite a bit more complex. I used Play-Doh again to separate the colors.

10.5″ W x 10.5″ D x 27.5″ H

Hand molded cement.

$1700

 

Copyright © 2014 Sam Hingston, All rights reserved.

The Winner

The Winner

I found The Winner particularly interesting because of the clothing. One of the things I enjoyed about making Monday was creating the impression of a human body under fabric. The Winner was similar but quite a bit more complex. I used Play-Doh again to separate the colors.

10.5″ W x 10.5″ D x 27.5″ H

Hand molded cement.

$1700

 

Copyright © 2014 Sam Hingston, All rights reserved.

A Day in the Life

A Day in the Life

Some friends gave me a section of a cherry tree that had come down in their garden. I carved the bulk of the mushroom cap out of the cherry, the grains and colors giving it a naturally beautiful look. The wood itself wasn’t quite dry enough, so I expedited the process by soaking it in denatured alcohol for four days and then letting it air dry. I weighed it frequently, and at about six weeks the weight stopped dropping and held steady for several days. This meant that all the alcohol had evaporated, and I could continue with the piece. To finish the piece, I used oil with UV inhibitors to prevent fading of the purple heartwood.

 

13″ W x 10″ D x 8.5″ H  

Wood, Stainless Steel.

Granite base.

$3200

 

Copyright © 2014 Sam Hingston, All rights reserved.

A Day in the Life

A Day in the Life

Some friends gave me a section of a cherry tree that had come down in their garden. I carved the bulk of the mushroom cap out of the cherry, the grains and colors giving it a naturally beautiful look. The wood itself wasn’t quite dry enough, so I expedited the process by soaking it in denatured alcohol for four days and then letting it air dry. I weighed it frequently, and at about six weeks the weight stopped dropping and held steady for several days. This meant that all the alcohol had evaporated, and I could continue with the piece. To finish the piece, I used oil with UV inhibitors to prevent fading of the purple heartwood.

 

13″ W x 10″ D x 8.5″ H  

Wood, Stainless Steel.

Granite base.

$3200

 

Copyright © 2014 Sam Hingston, All rights reserved.

Idle Time

Idle Time

Idle Time was another attempt at expressing a particular mood using posture and position. Wrapping the corner of a blanket and a hand over the edge of the block creates the sense that its part of the sculpture rather than something the sculpture sits on.

 

17.25″ W x 7.5″ D x  9″ H

Hand molded cement, Wood.

$950

 

Copyright © 2014 Sam Hingston, All rights reserved.

Idle Time

Idle Time

Idle Time was another attempt at expressing a particular mood using posture and position. Wrapping the corner of a blanket and a hand over the edge of the block creates the sense that its part of the sculpture rather than something the sculpture sits on.

 

17.25″ W x 7.5″ D x  9″ H

Hand molded cement, Wood.

$950

 

Copyright © 2014 Sam Hingston, All rights reserved.

The Guardian

The Guardian

The Guardian was a very satisfying piece for me. The design is very stylized while keeping with correct human proportion to create an almost supernatural feel. I paid a lot of attention to lines and shapes and think I managed to give this piece that simple elegance I have talked about before.

 

7″ W x 7″ D x 17.5″ H

Cherry.

Granite base.

SOLD

 

Copyright © 2014 Sam Hingston, All rights reserved.

The Guardian

The Guardian

The Guardian was a very satisfying piece for me. The design is very stylized while keeping with correct human proportion to create an almost supernatural feel. I paid a lot of attention to lines and shapes and think I managed to give this piece that simple elegance I have talked about before.

 

7″ W x 7″ D x 17.5″ H

Cherry.

Granite base.

SOLD

 

Copyright © 2014 Sam Hingston, All rights reserved.

The Guardian

The Guardian

The Guardian was a very satisfying piece for me. The design is very stylized while keeping with correct human proportion to create an almost supernatural feel. I paid a lot of attention to lines and shapes and think I managed to give this piece that simple elegance I have talked about before.

 

7″ W x 7″ D x 17.5″ H

Cherry.

Granite base.

SOLD

 

Copyright © 2014 Sam Hingston, All rights reserved.

The Guardian

The Guardian

The Guardian was a very satisfying piece for me. The design is very stylized while keeping with correct human proportion to create an almost supernatural feel. I paid a lot of attention to lines and shapes and think I managed to give this piece that simple elegance I have talked about before.

 

7″ W x 7″ D x 17.5″ H

Cherry.

Granite base.

SOLD

 

Copyright © 2014 Sam Hingston, All rights reserved.

The Gift

The Gift

The Gift is another generation of the stylized human form I used in The Guardian. Like The Guardian, I focused on lines and shapes. I also used negative space to give complexity to the design without making it more complicated.

Another thing I kept in mind with this piece was that I wanted the bowl and the person to be two separate pieces of art. I wanted each piece to be complete and beautiful even in the absence of the other.

 

7″ W x 7″ D x 7.5″ H

Wood (Cherry, Maple, Purple Heartwood, Red Heartwood), Stainless Steel

Granite Base.

$1500

 

Copyright © 2014 Sam Hingston, All rights reserved.

The Gift

The Gift

The Gift is another generation of the stylized human form I used in The Guardian. Like The Guardian, I focused on lines and shapes. I also used negative space to give complexity to the design without making it more complicated.

Another thing I kept in mind with this piece was that I wanted the bowl and the person to be two separate pieces of art. I wanted each piece to be complete and beautiful even in the absence of the other.

 

7″ W x 7″ D x 7.5″ H

Wood (Cherry, Maple, Purple Heartwood, Red Heartwood), Stainless Steel

Granite Base.

$1500

 

Copyright © 2014 Sam Hingston, All rights reserved.

The Gift

The Gift

The Gift is another generation of the stylized human form I used in The Guardian. Like The Guardian, I focused on lines and shapes. I also used negative space to give complexity to the design without making it more complicated.

Another thing I kept in mind with this piece was that I wanted the bowl and the person to be two separate pieces of art. I wanted each piece to be complete and beautiful even in the absence of the other.

 

7″ W x 7″ D x 7.5″ H

Wood (Cherry, Maple, Purple Heartwood, Red Heartwood), Stainless Steel

Granite Base.

$1500

 

Copyright © 2014 Sam Hingston, All rights reserved.

The Gift

The Gift

The Gift is another generation of the stylized human form I used in The Guardian. Like The Guardian, I focused on lines and shapes. I also used negative space to give complexity to the design without making it more complicated.

Another thing I kept in mind with this piece was that I wanted the bowl and the person to be two separate pieces of art. I wanted each piece to be complete and beautiful even in the absence of the other.

 

7″ W x 7″ D x 7.5″ H

Wood (Cherry, Maple, Purple Heartwood, Red Heartwood), Stainless Steel

Granite Base.

$1500

 

Copyright © 2014 Sam Hingston, All rights reserved.

Jelly

Jelly

My inspiration for Jelly came from seeing a picture of a jellyfish. I thought the ribbon like quality of the center tentacles (actually called oral arms) was magnificent and wondered if I could carve such a thing out of wood. The challenge was exciting, so I found a big chunk of maple and started cutting. Once I knew the tentacles were going to work, I started making the bell. I wanted side grain all the way around for a uniform look, so I built it out of many smaller pieces.

 

8.5″ W x 8.5″ D x 34″ H

Wood, Copper.

Suspended with steel cable.

$3200

 

Copyright © 2014 Sam Hingston, All rights reserved.

Jelly

Jelly

My inspiration for Jelly came from seeing a picture of a jellyfish. I thought the ribbon like quality of the center tentacles (actually called oral arms) was magnificent and wondered if I could carve such a thing out of wood. The challenge was exciting, so I found a big chunk of maple and started cutting. Once I knew the tentacles were going to work, I started making the bell. I wanted side grain all the way around for a uniform look, so I built it out of many smaller pieces.

 

8.5″ W x 8.5″ D x 34″ H

Wood, Copper.

Suspended with steel cable.

$3200

 

Copyright © 2014 Sam Hingston, All rights reserved.

Sketch

Sketch

Sketch came from looking through drawings. I liked the way detailed drawing looked next to rough sketching and wondered if I could depict an unfinished sketch as a 3D sculpture. It took me some time to determine how to achieve this. It wasn’t until the wood portion was completed that I finally figured out how to make this piece work.

 
4.5″ W x 4″ D x 9″ H

Maple, Cherry, Painted wire.

$450

 

Copyright © 2014 Sam Hingston, All rights reserved.

Sketch

Sketch

Sketch came from looking through drawings. I liked the way detailed drawing looked next to rough sketching and wondered if I could depict an unfinished sketch as a 3D sculpture. It took me some time to determine how to achieve this. It wasn’t until the wood portion was completed that I finally figured out how to make this piece work.

 
4.5″ W x 4″ D x 9″ H

Maple, Cherry, Painted wire.

$450

 

Copyright © 2014 Sam Hingston, All rights reserved.

Sketch

Sketch

Sketch came from looking through drawings. I liked the way detailed drawing looked next to rough sketching and wondered if I could depict an unfinished sketch as a 3D sculpture. It took me some time to determine how to achieve this. It wasn’t until the wood portion was completed that I finally figured out how to make this piece work.

 
4.5″ W x 4″ D x 9″ H

Maple, Cherry, Painted wire.

$450

 

Copyright © 2014 Sam Hingston, All rights reserved.

Jelly 2

Jelly 2

I have decided to continue with the jellyfish theme. I like the challenge of making the tentacles feel animated and fluid.  I want them to appear suspended in water, as if floating by. This Jelly was made to be displayed on a base rather than hanging on a cable like the first one.

 

7″ W x 7″ D x 25.5″ H

Wood, copper.

Granite base.

$2700

Now at Bush Barn Art Center.

 

Copyright © 2014 Sam Hingston, All rights reserved.

Jelly #2

Jelly #2

I have decided to continue with the jellyfish theme. I like the challenge of making the tentacles feel animated and fluid.  I want them to appear suspended in water, as if floating by. This Jelly was made to be displayed on a base rather than hanging on a cable like the first one.

 

7″ W x 7″ D x 25.5″ H

Wood, copper.

Granite base.

$2700

Now at Bush Barn Art Center.

 

Copyright © 2014 Sam Hingston, All rights reserved.

Cerulean Repose

Cerulean Repose

I was going for a striking effect with the colors in this piece. I like the way bright colors look when combined with more natural wood tones and have been very happy with the way birch dowel looks after being soaked in blue dye overnight. I discovered while doing this piece that if I put the dowel in the dye and then place it all in a vacuum chamber, the dye is absorbed in moments and much more uniformly than soaking alone.

 

7″ W x 4″ D x 9.5″ H

Wood.

Granite base.

$1450

Now showing at Art on Broadway.

 

Copyright © 2014 Sam Hingston, All rights reserved.

Jelly 3

Jelly 3

I have been experimenting with epoxy resins for the last 5 or 6 months now. I tried this and that, made a lot of mistakes and felt a little frustrated more than once along the way. Sometimes though things worked quite well and I achieved something that I was very happy with. Eventually I was confident enough in working with the resin to use it in a piece and of course a jellyfish was the obvious place to start.

 

7″ W x 7″ D x ″ 22.75″ H

Wood, Copper, Resin.

Granite base.

$2900

 

Copyright © 2014 Sam Hingston, All rights reserved.

Jelly #3

Jelly #3

I have been experimenting with epoxy resins for the last 5 or 6 months now. I tried this and that, made a lot of mistakes and felt a little frustrated more than once along the way. Sometimes though things worked quite well and I achieved something that I was very happy with. Eventually I was confident enough in working with the resin to use it in a piece and of course a jellyfish was the obvious place to start.

 

7″ W x 7″ D x ″ 22.75″ H

Wood, Copper, Resin.

Granite base.

$2900

 

Copyright © 2014 Sam Hingston, All rights reserved.

False Dawn

False Dawn

I have been playing with the use of wood grains as a part of the overall design rather than just a beautifying feature. I liked how the grain patterns in the walnut I used in Cerulean Repose followed the lines of the body and decided to push it a little further by using the grains to essentially draw a picture. I had purchased a lovely piece of sliced burl wood that I thought looked just like fire. I experimented with layering different types of wood and was quickly reminded of seeing bush fires burning off in the distance late at night as a small child in Australia. I held that small snippet of childhood memory in mind when designing False Dawn.

 

7″ W x 7″ D x ″ 22.75″ H

Wood.

Granite base

$800

Now showing at Bush Barn Art Center.

 

 

Copyright © 2014 Sam Hingston, All rights reserved.

Unfurling

Unfurling

One of the great moments in working with wood is the first application of a finish. It is at this point that all the beauty of the wood is revealed. All the colors and the grain patterns come to life, sometimes in ways I don't expect. I am really struck by the beauty of the wood in this piece, the colors are spectacular. The design is purposefully simple with long curvy lines giving it a graceful feel. Unfurling was carved out of a large chunk of walnut. 

 

17.25″ W x 7.5″ D x  9″ H

Walnut, Purple heartwood.

Granite base.

$750

Now showing at Bush Barn Art Center.

 

Copyright © 2014 Sam Hingston, All rights reserved.

 

Unfurling

Unfurling

One of the great moments in working with wood is the first application of a finish. It is at this point that all the beauty of the wood is revealed. All the colors and the grain patterns come to life, sometimes in ways I don't expect. I am really struck by the beauty of the wood in this piece, the colors are spectacular. The design is purposefully simple with long curvy lines giving it a graceful feel. Unfurling was carved out of a large chunk of walnut. 

 

17.25″ W x 7.5″ D x  9″ H

Walnut, Purple heartwood.

Granite base.

$750

Now showing at Bush Barn Art Center.

 

 

Copyright © 2014 Sam Hingston, All rights reserved.

 

Splash Series  - Splash #1

Splash Series - Splash #1

The inspiration for this series came out of my interest in portraying two things, the effect of a force applied by one object on another, and giving static objects a sense of motion. A splash is particularly interesting because it is explosive, fast and fleeting. This adds the element of time to the challenge. I am looking to create the sense that this really is just a split second moment in a rapidly evolving interaction.

I have used 1 1/2" stainless steel balls and an over sized coffee bean carved out of cherry wood as the falling objects. The liquid is carved out of maple or cherry wood.

Like a snowflake, no two splashes are the same.

Maple, Stainless Steel, Ceramic Cup.

$200

Now showing at Bush Barn Art Center.

 

 Copyright © 2014 Sam Hingston, All rights reserved.

Splash Series - Splash #2

Splash Series - Splash #2

The inspiration for this series came out of my interest in portraying two things, the effect of a force applied by one object on another, and giving static objects a sense of motion. A splash is particularly interesting because it is explosive, fast and fleeting. This adds the element of time to the challenge. I am looking to create the sense that this really is just a split second moment in a rapidly evolving interaction.

I have used 1 1/2" stainless steel balls and an over sized coffee bean carved out of cherry wood as the falling objects. The liquid is carved out of maple or cherry wood.

Like a snowflake, no two splashes are the same.

Maple, Stainless Steel, Ceramic Cup.

$200

Now showing at Art on Broadway.

 

Copyright © 2014 Sam Hingston, All rights reserved.

Splash Series - Splash #4

Splash Series - Splash #4

The inspiration for this series came out of my interest in portraying two things, the effect of a force applied by one object on another, and giving static objects a sense of motion. A splash is particularly interesting because it is explosive, fast and fleeting. This adds the element of time to the challenge. I am looking to create the sense that this really is just a split second moment in a rapidly evolving interaction.

I have used 1 1/2" stainless steel balls and an over sized coffee bean carved out of cherry wood as the falling objects. The liquid is carved out of maple or cherry wood.

Like a snowflake, no two splashes are the same.

Maple, Cherry, Ceramic Cup.

SOLD.

 

Copyright © 2014 Sam Hingston, All rights reserved.

Splash Series #10

Splash Series #10

The inspiration for this series came out of my interest in portraying two things, the effect of a force applied by one object on another, and giving static objects a sense of motion. A splash is particularly interesting because it is explosive, fast and fleeting. This adds the element of time to the challenge. I am looking to create the sense that this really is just a split second moment in a rapidly evolving interaction.

I have used 1 1/2" stainless steel balls and an over sized coffee bean carved out of cherry wood as the falling objects. The liquid is carved out of maple or cherry wood.

Like a snowflake, no two splashes are the same.

Maple, Cherry, Ceramic Cup.

$200

Now showing at Art on Broadway.

Splash Series #11

Splash Series #11

The inspiration for this series came out of my interest in portraying two things, the effect of a force applied by one object on another, and giving static objects a sense of motion. A splash is particularly interesting because it is explosive, fast and fleeting. This adds the element of time to the challenge. I am looking to create the sense that this really is just a split second moment in a rapidly evolving interaction.

I have used 1 1/2" stainless steel balls and an over sized coffee bean carved out of cherry wood as the falling objects. The liquid is carved out of maple or cherry wood.

Like a snowflake, no two splashes are the same.

Maple, Cherry, Ceramic Cup.

$200

Now showing at Art on Broadway.

Splash Series #12

Splash Series #12

The inspiration for this series came out of my interest in portraying two things, the effect of a force applied by one object on another, and giving static objects a sense of motion. A splash is particularly interesting because it is explosive, fast and fleeting. This adds the element of time to the challenge. I am looking to create the sense that this really is just a split second moment in a rapidly evolving interaction.

I have used 1 1/2" stainless steel balls and an over sized coffee bean carved out of cherry wood as the falling objects. The liquid is carved out of maple or cherry wood.

Like a snowflake, no two splashes are the same.

Maple, Cherry, Ceramic Cup.

$200

Now showing at Art on Broadway.

Orion's Belt

Orion's Belt

It occurred to me one day that it would be interesting to depict constellations using starfish. The starfish in this piece are made in the same style as “On the Edge,” using purple heartwood and maple with colored birch inlay. Rather than use granite as a base, I chose colored cement. I didn't fully sift the dry cement so that small lumps remained. This meant that only the surface of the lumps would come in contact with the tint so that once cast and set, the surface of the block could be ground down a little to reveal white spots suggesting stars in distant space.

 

7.75”W x 4.5”D x 5”H

Purple heartwood, maple, birch, cement.

$575

Now showing at Art on Broadway.

Splash Series #6

Splash Series #6

The inspiration for this series came out of my interest in portraying two things, the effect of a force applied by one object on another, and giving static objects a sense of motion. A splash is particularly interesting because it is explosive, fast and fleeting. This adds the element of time to the challenge. I am looking to create the sense that this really is just a split second moment in a rapidly evolving interaction.

I have used 1 1/2" stainless steel balls and an over sized coffee bean carved out of cherry wood as the falling objects. The liquid is carved out of maple or cherry wood.

Like a snowflake, no two splashes are the same.

Cherry, Ceramic Cup.

$200

Splash Series #7

Splash Series #7

The inspiration for this series came out of my interest in portraying two things, the effect of a force applied by one object on another, and giving static objects a sense of motion. A splash is particularly interesting because it is explosive, fast and fleeting. This adds the element of time to the challenge. I am looking to create the sense that this really is just a split second moment in a rapidly evolving interaction.

I have used 1 1/2" stainless steel balls and an over sized coffee bean carved out of cherry wood as the falling objects. The liquid is carved out of maple or cherry wood.

Like a snowflake, no two splashes are the same.

Maple, Stainless Steel, Ceramic Cup.

$200

Splash Series #8

Splash Series #8

The inspiration for this series came out of my interest in portraying two things, the effect of a force applied by one object on another, and giving static objects a sense of motion. A splash is particularly interesting because it is explosive, fast and fleeting. This adds the element of time to the challenge. I am looking to create the sense that this really is just a split second moment in a rapidly evolving interaction.

I have used 1 1/2" stainless steel balls and an over sized coffee bean carved out of cherry wood as the falling objects. The liquid is carved out of maple or cherry wood.

Like a snowflake, no two splashes are the same.

Maple, Cherry, Ceramic Cup.

$200

Splash Series #9

Splash Series #9

The inspiration for this series came out of my interest in portraying two things, the effect of a force applied by one object on another, and giving static objects a sense of motion. A splash is particularly interesting because it is explosive, fast and fleeting. This adds the element of time to the challenge. I am looking to create the sense that this really is just a split second moment in a rapidly evolving interaction.

I have used 1 1/2" stainless steel balls and an over sized coffee bean carved out of cherry wood as the falling objects. The liquid is carved out of maple or cherry wood.

Like a snowflake, no two splashes are the same.

Walnut, Cherry, Ceramic Cup.

$200